NOTE: This blog post does not promote investment advice. Speak to a financial advisor.

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Gamestop, Bed Bath & Beyond, Tesla Motors, Macy’s, Virgin Galactic.

What do a few struggling brick-and-mortar companies have to do with the King of EV and an English billionaire’s potentially stillborn spaceflight company? They are all part of an assortment of companies that are heavily sold short.

Short-selling is when an investor borrows a stock, selling it immediately at a high price, hoping that the price will drop such that when they return the borrowed stock, they made a profit. …


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Introduction

Do you want to be a quant and predict the movement of stocks for your own profit? Well then you better have a worthy source of data!

Quant shops are nowadays relying on increasingly esoteric sources of information to compete with one-another in predicting trends in the financial markets. The term used here is the ‘alpha’ of a trading strategy— and alpha disappears quickly for data sources.

Bygone are the days when one could look at seasonal trends in stock prices or run pearson correlation coefficients between stocks to produce a trading margin. Graduate analysts have run ARIMA models and…


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Image Source

Ever wondered where in London most start-ups are born?

Well, you’re in luck! We will plot an animated graph of exactly this.

(Or skip to the bottom to see it now)

Notebook

A jupyter notebook containing code for this analysis can be found here.

The Dataset

To obtain information about company headquarters, we have scraped the REST API of Companies House, the UK’s registrar of companies. Their API (link here) is outstanding, and commendable for supporting public transparency and open-data standards.

We scraped 10K companies with listed offices in London and that had been founded in 2011–2020 using said API and a python…


The market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent. ~ Keynes

With cries of ‘The Recession is Coming’ in the air, many financial gurus are recommending for people to move their assets into currency and other non-stock financial products.

However simultaneously, the stock market has been going veritably crazy since the latest earnings reports:

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Tesla (TSLA) stock gains, from https://finance.yahoo.com/


Historic yield curves.
Historic yield curves.
Historic U.S. treasury yield curves (Wikipedia)

So you’ve most probably been bombarded with apocalyptic rantings over the Yield Curve Inversion — So what’s the deal with the infamous yield curve, and its inversion?

Lets start with an introduction to what yield curves are, and thence to its infamous inversion.

Treasury Bills and the Yield Curve

The yield curve referenced is the amount of interest that investors receive from the U.S. government in return for lending the latter money. This occurs in the form of buying U.S. treasury securities, a debt obligation instrument issued by the U.S. Department of the Treasury in conjunction with the Federal Reserve Bank.

The Quant Scoop

The latest financial scoops, from the eyes of quantitative analysis and data science.

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